Product article

Products Built With Purpose

How is Technology Changing the Events Industry?

Technology has long been the disruptive force behind many markets, but we’re still at the beginning of this frontier when it comes to the evolution of the events industry. Major festivals, conferences and community events are already beginning to reshape the way they plan, develop, and experience events prior, during, and post event. And whether it’s technology shaping the way events are experienced, or whether it's technology evolving with growing expectations of events, the next five years will see a major improvement on almost every event touchpoint.

Interaction

RFID technology allows us to design activations where visitors can interact with different brands, vendors, and sponsors of an event.  Visitors can have a conversation with the brands they like, and even meet people who are best suited to their own interests. 

 

Personalisation

Instead of attendees being just one of the crowd, RFID technology means all vendors and brands know exactly who they’re speaking to. TAP’s wearables are pre-programmed with personalised information to ensure each event partner can deliver the best experience possible.

 

Event Flow

The layout of any event is critical to its success. RFID enabled entry points mean that visitors can enter an event smoothly, and RFID enabled cashless transactions decrease queues which increases revenues. The more seamless the experience, the more enjoyable the event.

 

Digital Sharing

Sharing experiences on social media is now common place behaviour. With RFID enabled engagement, all it takes is a TAP to post your favourite event experience. 

 

Communication

Knowing where key members of staff are during a live event is critical to excellent event execution. Whether it is security, the event production team, vendors, or cleaners, simply login to TAP for accurate insights.

 

Security

Replacing paper tickets with TAP's smart wearables, removes the pain of unnecessary event processes and alleviates the trials of secondary ticketing.